My name is Sania and I suffer from a brain tumour that impacts my everyday life in many different ways.

It’s not easy being a patient of cancer or having a tumour and sometimes it gets a bit too much, even without the hassle of being a student who is supporting a family whilst trying to live a normal life. Sometimes you just need a respite, a break away from your life where you can pretend to be someone else, someone who isn’t ill or doesn’t have the weight of the world on their shoulders. Sounds like a long shot, right? But its not. This dream is made a reality at Youth Cancer Trust in Bournemouth.

The charity in short, is one of the most amazing places that I have ever been to. It’s a place where you can kick back, relax and just enjoy yourself without having to worry about anything. Whether you’re taking a stroll down the beach, enjoying the lovely food prepared by John or Brenda, or having a long catch up with Georgie and Peter, everything seems at peace.

For me, it’s a home away from home. I love everyone there like my own family and would recommend it to everyone.

An extract from Sania’s Blog, which you can read in full here

Life with a Tumour- the good, the bad and the ugly by Sania Choudhry…

I have always wanted to write a blog post, albeit something a little more adventurous would have been a little better, but my choice in the matter is somewhat limited. Anyways, here goes!

My name is Sania Choudhry and I live in Manchester, UK. I was diagnosed with a Craniopharyngioma (a pituitary tumour) at the age of 11 and have since been tossed in a hectic and unwanted tornado that is an inevitable side effect of any illness. Although my tumour was not cancerous or malignant, it still came with a long list of affects that ended up changing my entire life.

I was too young to fully comprehend the reality of the situation at the time but I knew something wasn’t quite right when my dad came out of the doctor’s room in tears. Little did I know that the following years of my life were going to consist of nothing more than excruciating pain, months confined to a single ward in a hospital (which in itself was rather nice) and praying that the end was not near. I went from being a healthy, happy and extremely passionate child to a depressed, empty child that wished for nothing more than a normal life…

Read Sania’s blog in full here